Listen to A.R. Rahman ft. M.I.A. (from Slumdog Millionaire)

Slumdogmillionaire

If you have a moment this holiday season, you should go see Slumdog Millionaire, a fantastic new movie directed by Danny Boyle that opened in the U.S. a few weeks ago. Set in contemporary Mumbai, the movie tells a wonderful story about beating the odds and coming out on top. It's both inspiring and touching at the same time.

The movie also features an excellent soundtrack that was put together by famed Bollywood composer A.R. Rahman. His original score perfectly echoes the modern-day hustle and bustle of the sprawling town of Mumbai, fusing intoxicating traditional Indian rhythms with Western hip hop beats.

A.R. Rahman worked together with M.I.A. to create "O... Saya" that is heard at pivotal scenes in the movie and reflects the raw realism of Mumbai's street scenes.

M.I.A. and A.R. Rahman met in Mumbai last year when the Sri Lankan singer spent time in Rahman's studio to record "Kala." In an interview with URB Magazine, M.I.A. referred to the producer as "the Indian Timbaland," which gives you an idea of what a unique talent he is.  M.I.A. obviously jumped at the chance to work on "O... Saya" with the famed composer. Rahman says in a press release, "She's a real powerhouse. Somebody played me her CD and I thought, `Who is this girl? She came here and knew all my work, had followed my work for ages. I said, `Cut the crap, this "my idol" crap. You have to teach me.'"

Listen to a clip of "O... Saya" by A.R. Rahman ft. M.I.A.:

December 18, 2008 in Soundtracks | Permalink | Comments (4)

Hell Bent Soundtrack

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"Hell Bent" Cast

"Hell Bent" is one of the first horror flicks that was specifically written and made for the gay community (and of course others who enjoy a good horror movie). The soundtrack for the movie is a very unique project as well. Instead of offering the usual gay circuit fare, it serves up songs by  punk and fringe bands that are gay/bi/trans and represent a side of gay music that is accessible and fun, as well as represents independent gay musicians around Santa Monica, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco – including Pansy Division, The Dicks, Texas Terri and Daisy Chaynes.

Writer and director Paul Etheredge was inspired by the grand tunes of "Black Orpheus" and wanted that same spirit for "Hell Bent." "Production values at this level of recording are often really rough. These are guitar and bass and drum bands, not electronic so much, so we really went for spirit and energy," musical director John Norris tells Arjan. "'Black Orpheus' is wall to wall music - so I took [Paul's] notes on energy and listened for three months to everything I could find - all in my car on the way to my office, or the store, or anywhere. I kept Post-it notes on my dash and made notes on every CD case that I listened to. I got back to nearly everyone, but found a wealth from local bands."

Centaur Records is considering to release and distribute the soundtrack this fall. Read an interview with John Norris to learn more about the soundtrack and its tracks.

Full tracklisting of the "Hell Bent" soundtrack after the jump.

1)   "First Betrayal" - Pansy Division –4:01

2)   "Lifetime Problems" - Texas Terri & the Stiff Ones – 2:28

3)   "Hold On Tight" - Household Names –2:54

4)   "Gone" -  THUTHEN – 4:40

5)   "Never Shut Up"- Texas Terri Bomb – 3:16

6)   "Might As Well Be You"-  Skinjobs – 3:38

7)   "Who's Your Daddy "- Nick Name – 3:07

8)   "Femme Fatale" - Three Dollar Bill –2:49

9)   "Porno Di Giorno" -Nick Name – 2:33

10)   "Strike 3" - Texas Terri Bomb – 3:09

11)   "I Think I Love You" - Paul Lekakis – 3:50

12)   "He Waits Too Long" - IAMLOVED – 3:12

13)   "Go Away Before I Change My Mind" - Skinjobs – 5:13

14)   "Edge of Town"  -Daisy Chaynes – 2:58

15)   "Know You " -  Best Revenge – 1:35

16)   “Foot Transportation”  IAMLOVED –4:19

17)    "Everything"  - Colton Ford – 9:44

September 19, 2005 in Soundtracks | Permalink | Comments (5)

"Bad Education" Soundtrack

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Dressed for Success: Gael Garcia Bernal
in "Bad Education"

"La Mala Educacion" ("Bad Education") is director Pedro Almodóvar's latest cinematic masterpiece that features a breathtaking performance by Mexican actor Gael Garcia Bernal. This film noir tells the story about two kids who discover sex, cinema and fear at a Catholic high school at the start of the ‘60s. Father Manolo, the school principal and their literature teacher, is witness to and part of these discoveries. The three characters meet twice again, at the end of the ‘70s and in the ‘80s. The re–encounter will mark the life and death of some of them.

Almodóvar once again explores taboo topics in this gay-themed movie including sexual abuse, gender confusion, pedophile priests and homosexuality in the Catholic Church. "Bad Education" establishes Gael Garcia Bernal as a bona fide sex symbol. The director has an eye for capturing his raw beauty. He films Bernal swimming in his white jockey briefs (and zooming in on his crotch) and showing him excercising shirtless in skimpy gym shorts.

The movie is also an ode to the legendary Spanish singer and gay icon Sara Montiel who makes a cameo in the movie. The diva has been called Spain's answer to Judy Garland via Mae West. Montiel is the main inspiration for the movie's main drag character Zahara who is played by Bernal. The sultry Zahara performs Montiel's "Quizás, Quizás, Quizás" dressed in a glamorous Jean Paul Gautier dress.

The song is featured on the "Bad Education" soundtrack that was put together by Alberto Iglesias. In addition to his original score, the evocative soundtrack recording also includes vintage European pop songs from the 1960s such as "Maniquí Parisien," also sung by Sara Montiel, and "Cuore Matto," sung by Little Tony – as well as performances of "Moon River " and the Italian song  "Torna a Surriento," and an excerpt from Rossini ’s Petite Messe Solonelle.

Arjanwrites_audio  Sample "Quizás, Quizás, Quizás" by Sara Montiel [MP3]
Arjanwrites_video  Watch the movie trailer

January 21, 2005 in Soundtracks | Permalink | Comments (5)